Read Lottie And Lisa by Erich Kästner Online

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Two nine year old girls meet at a holiday home. The movie The Parent Trap was based on this book.Es ist lange her, daß mir Luise und Lotte begegnet sind. Allerdings erinnere ich mich noch genau, daß ich die Situation, in der sich die beiden kennenlernten, sehr gut nachvollziehen konnte, denn ich war selbst schon einige Male, angeblich zu meinem Besten, zur Erholung in einTwo nine year old girls meet at a holiday home. The movie The Parent Trap was based on this book.Es ist lange her, daß mir Luise und Lotte begegnet sind. Allerdings erinnere ich mich noch genau, daß ich die Situation, in der sich die beiden kennenlernten, sehr gut nachvollziehen konnte, denn ich war selbst schon einige Male, angeblich zu meinem Besten, zur Erholung in ein Ferienheim gesteckt worden. Schon damals war mir, ähnlich wie Lotte, nicht klar, wovon ein Kind sich erholen sollte. So treffen sich die beiden ungleichen Mädchen also im wunderschönen Seebühl am Bühlsee im Ferienheim. Übrigens, die Sprachspielereien von Erich Kästner, die er für seine jungen Leser eingestreut hat, habe ich mit Begeisterung aufgenommen, so wie ich es auch geliebt habe, am Beginn jedes Kapitels von ihm ein bißchen neugierig gemacht zu werden, wenn er einen kleinen Ausblick gibt, was auf den nächsten Seiten geschehen wird. Sicher, es sind Kleinigkeiten, aber wegen diesen kleinen, wichtigen Nichtigkeiten wurde Erich Kästners Das doppelte Lottchen zu einem Lieblingsbuch vieler Kinder -- bis heute. Die Geschichte der grundverschiedenen Zwillinge ist schnell erzählt. Nachdem sie sich erstaunt betrachten und feststellen, daß sie sich wie ein Ei dem anderen gleichen, ist der nächste Schritt nicht schwer. Sie entdecken, daß sie dieselben Eltern haben, die sich vor vielen Jahren scheiden ließen, und beschließen, möglichst bald ihre Elternteile wieder zusammenzuführen. Dazu tauschen sie die Rollen. Die unordentliche, eher lockere Luise reist nach München, um dort den Haushalt der überlasteten, berufstätigen Mutter zu übernehmen. Das Hausmütterchen Lotte fährt zum Vater nach Wien, der die so sorgfältig planende, ordentliche Tochter nach den Ferien gar nicht mehr wiedererkennt. Selbst der geliebte Palatschinken scheint ihr nicht mehr zu schmecken. Als 1949 das Buch erstmals nach dem Krieg erschien, war es ein Skandal, denn die Hüter der Schriften für Kinder wollten das Thema Scheidung nicht im Kinderbuch thematisiert wissen und stuften deshalb Kästners Roman für Kinder als "Nicht empfehlenswert" ein. Gott sei Dank haben die Meinungen der vielen kleinen Leser mehr Gewicht, die mit heißen Ohren bei den Abenteuern der Zwillinge mitgefiebert haben. --Manuela Haselberger...

Title : Lottie And Lisa
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780140301670
Format Type : Hardback
Number of Pages : 141 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Lottie And Lisa Reviews

  • Manny
    2019-01-20 14:21

    I often see people here on Goodreads complaining that they can no longer read books the way they used to when they were kids. Once, you'd just get completely absorbed by the story and follow it breathlessly as it progressed, identifying with the characters and willing things to come out right for them. But now, you're too sophisticated; you keep on thinking about the author's style, and how he's manipulating you into believing this and expecting that, and anyway you saw someone else do it better in that book you read a few years ago. It's hard to keep focused on what's actually going on.I discover, to my surprise and delight, that there is a solution to this problem! I have recently been making efforts to improve my very unsatisfactory German (it's the language two-thirds of Switzerland speaks, even if they don't speak it here in Geneva), and I've been using my normal method of simply picking things up and reading them, starting with very easy stuff and gradually moving towards more challenging material. I'm guessing I now have the German reading age of a bright seven-year-old. But here's the amazing thing: I find I'm reading the books like a seven-year-old! The first few times I couldn't do it, because I was still spending too much effort acquiring the grammar and vocabulary. To be honest, this is still interfering with my pleasure every now and then, but mostly I'm just reading; I got through Das doppelte Lottchen in a little more than a day. And what a terrific book it is! Luise, nine, is at summer camp when a girl turns up who looks exactly like her. At first she's angry that someone else has stolen her face, but then she makes friends with Lotte and discovers something weird: not only has she got Luise's appearance, she was also born on the same day, in the same town. They're twins, but their parents (Luise lives with her dad, Lotte with her mom) have never told them!Evidently the parents have their reasons for doing this. Each one must have decided to act as though the other simply doesn't exist any more. Luise and Lotte are terrified by the thought that they'll never see each other again after camp is over. But what can a couple of nine-year-old girls do? And then they come up with a plan. They each take an exercise book and write down everything about the other's life, so that they have a full list of names, places, friends, teachers, favorite foods, all of it. And when it's time to go home, they swap identities.If I'd been reading this as a grown-up, I'd have been making various kinds of cool-headed comparisons: Shakespeare, The Parent Trap (distantly based on the story, but changed in many places), behaviorist and Freudian psychology, the author's background. But as it was, I was just plain enjoying it, and I was astonished to find that it moved me to tears several times. Erich Kästner is my German self's new favorite author. I've already raided my piggy-bank to buy another of his books.

  • Miriam
    2019-01-14 19:32

    I recently learned that the film "The Parent Trap" was based on a book so I gave it a read. It was good, could have stood a bit more development. I have a feeling there was more sly humor in the German that didn't really come through in English; may try a different translation.One thing I noticed, which I don't remember if it was present in the film, was the mother's financial difficulties and how Lottie was well-behaved not because of strict parenting but because of having to do the house-keeping, cooking, etc and not get into trouble which would cause her mother to miss work.

  • Manybooks
    2018-12-31 16:33

    I loved Das doppelte Lottchen (the German original) absolutely to pieces when I was a child and I have also watched and greatly enjoyed the German film version multiple times (the one from 1954 that had author Erich Kästner write the actual screen play); it is much more authentic than the generally more well-known and famous The Parent Trap (the original, starring Hayley Mills) which took some rather huge and for me, unforgivable, liberties with the plot (I know many adore the latter movie, but for me, it veers too much and too far from the original to ever be fully enjoyable).With this novel, Erich Kästner has definitely managed to realistically portray the many problems and issues faced by children of divorced parents, as well as the irresponsible behaviours that are at times exhibited by the same (separating very young twin siblings, and then not even telling them that they have siblings is NEVER an acceptable solution, as children are not objects or playthings). Das doppelte Lottchen (Lisa and Lottie) takes children, their hopes, dreams and desires seriously, and is also a reminder to adults (to parents) that children must not be ignored, that they deserve to know the truth, and that irresponsible adult behaviours can have problematic, difficult, even potentially dangerous consequences. And considering that Das doppelte Lottchen was penned in 1949, it is both amazing, and I guess also more than a trifle disconcerting and frustrating to have to acknowledge that similar heartbreaking scenarios are still prevalent and relevant nowadays, and on a global scale.

  • Mahdi Lotfi
    2019-01-16 16:30

    دو خواهر دوقلو بی خبر از وجود یکدیگر نزد پدر و مادری که اکنون با هم زندگی نمی کنند، به سر می برند، دست تصادف این دو را به دیدار هم می کشاند و ...

  • Melindam
    2019-01-03 17:27

    Vintage Classic and no mistake.My delight as an adult was almost totally unspoilt while reading. At one point, of course I started going down the road of "how could the parents do such a thing", but my 9-year-old self was firmly guarding the path and chased me back to enjoy the story.And I did, boy, I did it all right, though it was the first time I read it in the original German.I also have to add that I loved the illustrations back then and now. :) This books stays firmly on my "Favourites" shelf.

  • Manybooks
    2018-12-23 13:14

    I loved Das doppelte Lottchen (the German original) absolutely to pieces when I was a child (and have probably read said novel at least twenty or so times, and that is a conservative estimate at best). I have also and repeatedly watched and greatly enjoyed the German film version (the one from 1954 which had author Erich Kästner write the screen play and which starred actual twin girls as the main protagonists); it is much more authentic than the generally more well-known and famous Disney The Parent Trap movie (the original, starring Hayley Mills, I have not seen the more recent Lindsay Lohan version nor am I planning to) which takes some rather huge and for me almost unforgivable liberties with the plot (I do realise many seem to adore the parent trap movies, but for me, they veer too much and too far from Kästner's original plot and thematics to ever be fully or even partially enjoyable).With this novel, with Das doppelte Lottchen, author Erich Kästner has definitely managed to realistically portray the many problems and issues faced by children of divorced parents, as well as the irresponsible behaviours that are at times exhibited by the same (separating very young twin siblings, and then not even telling them that they have siblings is NEVER an acceptable solution, as children are not objects or playthings). Das doppelte Lottchen (actually titled as The Parent Trap in this new translation by the incomparable and talented Anthea Bell) takes children, their hopes, dreams and desires seriously, and is also a reminder to adults (to parents) that children must not be ignored, that they deserve to know the truth, and that irresponsible adult behaviours can have problematic, difficult, even potentially dangerous consequences. And considering that Das doppelte Lottchen was penned in 1949, it is both amazing, and I guess also more than a trifle disconcerting and frustrating to have to acknowledge that similar heartbreaking scenarios are still prevalent and relevant nowadays, and on a global scale.I do NOT often rank a translation (especially a translation of a personal favourite) with five stars, but Anthea Bell's recent 2014 English language rendition of Das doppelte Lottchen is for lack of a better word, simply and utterly perfect in every way. Presenting Erich Kästner's narrative in a delightfully authentic manner that while keeping as much as possible to the rhythm, cadence and feel of the original without fortunately providing a literal word-for-word translation of Kästner's words, Anthea Bell has provided a sweet story in and of itself, one that actually does not even feel like a translation, but incredibly and enjoyably reads like simply an entertaining and evocative account of Lisa and Lottie's escapades and struggles. The fact that ALL of the personal and geographic place names have been kept in the original, have been retained in the German of the original is an added bonus and makes this translation of Kästner's classic, makes Anthea Bell's The Parent Trap miles and miles above earlier translations (which, while most definitely readable and adequate, also do often change at least some of the names to German sounding variants that the translator I guess feels are more easily pronounced and understood by English language readers and speakers). Although for me, personally, Anthea Bell's The Parent Trap (and please note that the title does NOT in any way refer to the Hayley Mills or Lindsay Lohan movie versions) is absolute translation perfection, I should at least offer as a small caveat that Anthea Bell is British and that some of the expressions (actually many of them) have a distinct British feel (now I both love and actually much appreciate this, but I could perhaps see it potentially distracting and perhaps even confusing readers who are not all that familiar with British English idioms). But I for one, have simply and utterly adored this 2014 translation of Erich Kästner's Das doppelte Lottchen (almost on the same level and scale as the original) and am increasingly of the firm and unshaking opinion and belief that Anthea Bell is one of the best if not actually the best current translator of German children's literature into English. Five well-deserved stars and even a permeant resident on my favourites shelf (and finally, furthermore, unlike the translation of Das doppelte Lottchen published by Lizzie Skurnick Books, that I recently perused and reviewed, this here translation also contains ALL of the wonderful and evocative accompanying illustrations by Walter Trier).

  • Manybooks
    2019-01-10 21:33

    I loved Das doppelte Lottchen (the German original, from which Lisa and Lottie is translated) absolutely to pieces when I was a child and I have also watched and greatly enjoyed the German film version multiple times (the one from 1954 that had author Erich Kästner write the actual screen play); it is much more authentic than the generally more well-known and famous The Parent Trap (the original, starring Hayley Mills) which takes some rather huge and for me, unforgivable, liberties with the plot (I know many adore the latter movie, but for me, it veers too much and too far from the original to ever be fully enjoyable).With this novel, Erich Kästner has definitely managed to realistically portray the many problems and issues faced by children of divorced parents, as well as the irresponsible behaviours that are at times exhibited by the same (separating very young twin siblings, and then not even telling them that they have siblings is NEVER an acceptable solution, as children are not objects or playthings). Das doppelte Lottchen (Lisa and Lottie) takes children, their hopes, dreams and desires seriously, and is also a reminder to adults (to parents) that children must not be ignored, that they deserve to know the truth, and that irresponsible adult behaviours can have problematic, difficult, even potentially dangerous consequences. And considering that Das doppelte Lottchen was penned in 1949, it is both amazing, and I guess also more than a trifle disconcerting and frustrating to have to acknowledge that similar heartbreaking scenarios are still prevalent and relevant nowadays, and on a global scale.When I started to read this here English language rendition published by Lizzie Skurnick Books of Brooklyn, New York (the translator's name is not listed, but I am now pretty well one hundred percent sure that it is the 1950 translation by Cyrus Brooks, and why his name has not been acknowledged is both hard to understand and accept), I was at first rather taken aback that the location of the girls' camp where Lisa first meets Lottie (and where they discover that they are separated identical twins) is called Bohrlaken on Lake Bohren instead of (as in the German original) Seebühl on the Bühlsee. However, I very quickly and with much appreciation began to realise and understand that this minor change (and at least the location is still German sounding) is actually a very astute and prudent narrative strategy, as while Bohrlaken and Bohren would be comparatively easy to pronounce and/or read by the majority of English language speakers, the same cannot unfortunately be said with regard to Seebühl and Bühlsee (as the "ü" sound does not exist in English and can, in fact, be quite difficult to fully master). Considering that even in the original novel, in Das doppelte Lottchen, the camp location where Lisa and Lottie meet is fictitious, it really does make basic common sense to render the location into a German sounding place name that is a bit easier to pronounce in the English language translation, or rather, in this English language translation. Furthermore, this is also one of the comparatively few deliberate name and locality changes I have found, as the majority of the other locations (as well as personal names), such as, for example, Munich, Vienna and their respective street names have basically been kept the same as in the original (unless there might be potential pronunciation issues, and even then, as already mentioned, the changes are still presented in German, but simply in a more easily read and understood German for English language readers and/or listeners).Therefore and generally, happily, this edition of Lisa and Lottie is what I would strongly consider a more than successful English language translation, keeping both ALL of the content, the plot and as much of the style and vocabulary of the original as possible (whilst also not reading like a slavish and literal word-for-word rendition, which can result in awkwardness); there are perhaps a few clumsy parts (such as the translation of smile wrinkles for Lachfalten, which should probably be more reasonably translated as laugh lines), but these are generally so insignificant that they really are almost unnoticeable. And I was truly more than willing to give this translation of Das doppelte Lottchen a four star rating (not a five star, as sorry, the original novel is such a childhood and adulthood favourite that NO translation will generally ever sparkle with the same amount of magic for me) until I noticed that NONE of the accompanying original illustrations by Walter Trier have been retained, that instead of Trier's evocative and classic depictions, the ones that I grew up loving and adoring, the illustrations in this edition are anonymous, vague, and not even all that German or even European looking (both an insult to the memory and the legacy of Walter Trier as an illustrator and also at least somewhat causing a sense of uncomfortable disconnect between text and image). Still, highly recommended, although the illustrations truly are a huge and personal disappointment, as Walter Trier's illustrations are as much an integral part of this novel as Erich Kästner's text.Also, and honestly, finally, why does the book cover of this edition show the twins with curls, considering that while Lisa has curls, Lottie generally wears braids (and when Lisa and Lottie switch roles, when they switch places and locations, Lisa becomes Lottie with the strict braids in Munich, and Lottie becomes Lisa with the wild curls in Vienna). Although in no way a major issue (and thus not really affecting my star rating), I definitely would much prefer a cover image that shows one girl with braids and one girl with a curly hairdo.

  • Faeze Taheri
    2019-01-06 14:17

    فیلم اقتباسی از این کتاب از بهترین‌های دوران بچگی منه. یادمه کوچیک که بودم نوار آهنگایی که تو فیلم خونده میشد رو هم داشتم و شبا گاهی حتی روی تخت با گذاشتن واکمن بغل گوشم و شنیدن اونا میخوابیدم.اینطوریه که فکر میکنم جدا از ارزش خود فیلم، که به نظرم کم نیست، همه‌ش برای من حس خوب خاطرات گذشته و به قولی نوستالژی‌ه!برای همین وقتی که این کتابو پیدا کردم، که دقیقا یادم نیست کی بود، اما خیلی بعد از دیدن فیلمش بود که تعجب منو برانگیخت که فیلم رو از روی یک کتاب برداشتن، بسیار بسیار ذوق کردم. البته قابل ذکره که من بعد از خوندن کتاب رفتم و چک کردم که توی فیلم به اقتباس از این اثر اشاره شده و کیومرث پوراحمد نخواسته همه‌ی داستان رو تراوشات ذهن خودش جا برنه:) البته کتاب و فیلم تفاوتهایی هم دارن که خوب به دلیل تفاوتهای ناشی از فرهنگ دو کشور ایران و آلمانه. اما وفاداری فیلم خیلی خدشه‌دار نشدهاین کتاب رو میتونم به همه اونایی که مثل من عاشق فیلمش بودن توصیه کنم

  • Lisa Vegan
    2019-01-01 19:20

    Thanks to Goodreads friend Gundula (I can’t adequately thank her!) who gave me this copy of the book. So, I finally got a chance to read it. For years, ever since I knew that the movie The Parent Trap was based on this book, I’ve wanted to read it. My whole life I always wanted a twin sister, or at least siblings. This book would have definitely been a favorite book of mine had I read it at age 9 or 10, about the time I was first enjoying the movie. And, despite being a huge fan of Hayley Mills, I think I would have enjoyed the book even more than I enjoyed the movie.Delightful. Charming. Smart, very smart. I loved the writing style/translation. I loved the story. I loved the two girls. All of the characters are significantly different from those in The Parent Trap movie. The girls are only nine in the book, but they’re very mature. It’s got a more old fashioned tone than the movie and is a bit more sober in tone, but it’s also very funny in many places. The wait was worth it; it didn’t disappoint in the slightest.

  • Manybooks
    2018-12-22 20:30

    I loved Das doppelte Lottchen (the German original) absolutely to pieces when I was a child (and have probably read said novel at least twenty or so times, and that is a conservative estimate at best). I have also and repeatedly watched and greatly enjoyed the German film version (the one from 1954 which had author Erich Kästner write the screen play and that starred actual twin girls as the main protagonists); it is much more authentic than the generally more well-known and famous Disney The Parent Trap movie (the original, starring Hayley Mills, I have not seen the more recent Lindsay Lohan version nor am I planning to) as the Disney movie version takes some rather huge and for me almost unforgivable liberties with the plot (I do realise many seem to adore the parent trap movies, but for me, they veer too much and too far from Kästner's original plot and thematics to ever be fully or even partially enjoyable).With this novel, with Das doppelte Lottchen, author Erich Kästner has definitely managed to realistically portray the many problems and issues faced by children of divorced parents, as well as the irresponsible behaviours that are at times exhibited by the same (separating very young twin siblings, and then not even telling them that they have siblings is NEVER an acceptable solution, as children are not objects or playthings). Das doppelte Lottchen takes children, their hopes, dreams and desires seriously, and is also a reminder to adults (to parents) that children must not be ignored, that they deserve to know the truth, and that irresponsible adult behaviours can have problematic, difficult, even potentially dangerous consequences. And considering that Das doppelte Lottchen was penned in 1949, it is both amazing, and I guess also more than a trifle disconcerting and frustrating to have to acknowledge that similar heartbreaking scenarios are still prevalent and relevant nowadays, and on a global scale.When I started to read this first English language translation by Cyrus Brooks (published in 1950, and thus only one year after Kästner's original German), I was at first rather taken aback that the location of the girls' camp where Lisa first meets Lottie (and where they discover that they are separated identical twins) is called Bohrlaken on Lake Bohren instead of (as in the German original) Seebühl on the Bühlsee. However, I very quickly and with much appreciation began to realise and understand that this minor change (and at least the location is still German sounding) is actually a very astute and prudent narrative and translative strategy, as while Bohrlaken and Bohren would be comparatively easy to pronounce and/or read by the majority of English language speakers, the same cannot unfortunately be said with regard to Seebühl and Bühlsee (as the "ü" sound does not exist in English and is, in fact, a sound that can be difficult for particularly English language speakers to fully master). Considering that even in the original novel, in Das doppelte Lottchen, the camp location where Lisa and Lottie meet is fictitious, it really does make basic common sense to render the location into a German sounding place name that is a bit easier to pronounce in the English language translation, or rather, in this English language translation. Furthermore, this is also one of the comparatively few deliberate name and locality changes I have found, as the majority of the other locations (as well as personal names), such as, for example, Munich, Vienna and their respective street names have basically been kept the same as in the original (unless of course there might be potential pronunciation issues, and even then, as already mentioned, the changes are still presented in German, but simply in a more easily read and understood German for English language readers, or perhaps listeners if the novel were being read aloud).Therefore and generally, happily, Cyrus Brooks' Lottie and Lisa is what I would strongly consider a more than successful English language translation, keeping both ALL of the content, the plot and as much of the style and vocabulary of the original as possible (whilst also not reading like a slavish and literal word-for-word rendition, which often tends to result in awkwardness); there are perhaps a few clumsy parts (such as the translation of smile wrinkles for Lachfalten, which should probably be more reasonably translated as laugh lines), but these are generally so insignificant that they really are almost unnoticeable. Highly recommended and while perhaps not quite as spectacular and brilliant as the more recent 2014 English language translation by Anthea Bell, this is definitely a standardly good and still more than acceptable and usable English language rendition of Erich Kästner's classic (and unlike the more recent and anonymous Cyrus Brooks translation published by Lizzie Skurnick Books, this edition DOES, indeed, also contain the accompanying evocative illustrations by Walter Trier, whose illustrations of Kästner's children's books as as much part of the reading experience as the author's narrative and really should NEVER be removed or in some way replaced).

  • Evgeniya
    2018-12-23 17:28

    Толкова умна и забавна история за най-очарователна детска смелост и някои значителни родителски неволи! Чудесна беше възможността да я преживея още веднъж за себе си, но и като за първи път "през ушите" на дъщеря ми. Истинско бисерче в детската литература (особено в момичешката ѝ част).

  • Nadja
    2018-12-24 14:21

    Was für ein tolles Kinderbuch. Als Kind habe ich leider keine Kästner gelesen (soweit ich mich erinnere), aber die hätte ich sicher alle geliebt! Toller Schreibstil, wie manchmal wir Leser angesprochen werden, nie belehrend, sondern einfach weise. Lustige Geschichte, aber stets sehr realistisch und einfühlsam. Zu recht ein Klassiker!

  • Radina ☕ Ravenclaw
    2018-12-21 16:29

    Erich Kästner understands children – as he says adults should not forget that children’s unhappiness is as real and honest just like theirs, it doesn’t matter what children cry about, because in life it’s not important what you grieve about, only how much you grieve. He is not afraid to write about adults’ problems (like divorce) and their effect for children. And his stories are flavoured with considerable amount of humour, so that both young readers and their parents don’t forget to always see the funny side.

  • Gisoo
    2018-12-26 20:32

    بالاخره بعد از دیدن دو نسخه The parent trap و یک عدد خواهران غریب، از خوندن کتاب گریزی نبود، فقط قدری دیر و زود داشت اما سوخت و سوز خیر!

  • LPG
    2019-01-17 15:29

    Enjoyable. I loved the Parent Trap as a child, and I was astounded that it was based on a German children's classic I'd never heard of. I asked my Mum about it today and her answer was interesting. Erich Kästner, while usually beloved by lots of people around us growing up, was utterly detested by my grandfather. He believed Kästner guilty of one of the worst sorts of war crime: indifference.I realise I'm wading into murky territory here - isn't this the sort of thing that makes GR delete reviews? Plus who am I in all my neoliberal comforts to hurl accusations at someone based on a Wikipedia article and what my Mum said?So I'm asking you friends- do you know about this? What are your thoughts?Oh and by the way, nothing to do with Das Doppelte Lotchen- this was an excellent book!

  • Rebekah
    2019-01-04 16:36

    This is a charming little children's book (age 9-12?) that was the basis of Disney's beloved Hayley Mills vehicle: Parent Trap.That’s how it is at Bohrlaken on Lake Bohren, where the story begins which I am going to tell you. It’s a rather complicated story. And now and then you’ll have to pay careful attention if you are really going to get the hang of it. It’s quite straightforward at the beginning; it doesn’t begin to get complicated till later on. Lisa, the extrovert and Lottie, the introvert,meet at camp and discover that they are twins, separated by divorced parents. They change places to get to know the parents that they never even knew existed. In the book, the father is a well known composer and conductor, and the mother a hard working and struggling single mom. They divorced because the Dad, essentially selfish and focused on his music, was never home. He just wasn't meant to be a family man, he thinks. Yet he is a loving father to Lisa, as long as she is not too intrusive. Like the movie, the father has been snared by a cold unpleasant woman. Naturally, the girls plot to become a family again. There are some minor differences (the girls live in Vienna and Munich, for example) between the movies and this book, but the changes worked for the movies, as the original plot points work for this little book.

  • I Am
    2019-01-03 21:20

    First read (c. 2016)Now I'd say that this book is pretty good grounds for the film "The Parent Trap". It all began in a summer camp, where two girls met each other and are shocked to see that they looked alike. They later find out that they are the twins of a split couple, and they plot to bring them back together by pulling a switch! This was a delightful German tale, one of which I'd definitely recommend for a good read - a guten lesen!Second read (April 18, 2017)I must admit, this book was just as good as the first time I read it. And even better in paperback, too, because the one I got before that was an old, battered copy from the library stacks. Everything's the same, words, illustrations and all (except for a few typos involving "!" being replaced with "l"). The way Erich writes his story is incredibly unique for the time it was written in Germany. He uses incredible choices of wording, which get a hold of my emotions and really paint a good picture in my mind, whereas the masterful sketches are only there to help. I was deeply saddened by the chapter in which Lottie dreams about their parents' divorce and her separation from Lisa, and overjoyed when the husband and wife were brought back together again. The last line of the book, which is said by Lisa during a discussion between Lottie and the housekeeper Rosa about their parents having more children, is one I consider to be one of the greatest last lines ever written: "And twins every time!" This book has great value, and is worth a read for anyone, no matter what type of genre they like or reading level they prefer.

  • Akemi G
    2019-01-08 17:40

    Another childhood fav of mine. The English version's title and cover make it seem like this is just one of any kids' books, but this is actually quite sophisticated. I if I understand correctly, the original title "Das doppelte Lottchen" means Double Lottchen (Lottie). The cover art of the German edition conveys this idea well, showing two identical girls. It's a story of identity swap. There is something very fascinating about this theme, and many authors have tried it; Mark Twain wrote The Prince and the Pauper. There was a movie Face Off, which gave a new spin to this old theme. The theme ultimately asks the question of who we are. This humble novella works on this theme in a way a child can understand and enjoy. It's fun to read, and after the happy ending, you keep wondering.

  • Katy Noyes
    2019-01-13 15:33

    I never knew all the Parent Trap / twin swap films were based on a book until recently. And one I've been enjoying. Had to read it.And it's wonderful, as I expected.The original identical-twins-swap-parents story, Lottie and Lisa meet accidentally at a summer camp and realise they are actually twins separated by their parents' divorce. Deciding to spend time secretly with their unknown parent, the expected problems and situations arise, comic and not so, and a happy ending will hopefully be on the horizon for the lovely girls and their parents...A light read for children, a friendly narrator and sympathetic heroines who are easy to tell apart and a great story when you realise it is the first one!I'd say that with a parent, good for age 6+ and by themselves, from around age 8 will find this an engrossing and entertaining story.

  • Beth
    2019-01-03 19:20

    This is the book that Disney based "The Parent Trap" on and I was curious what the original was like: spoiler alert, quite different. I can see why they needed to change it though-- this works great as a children's book, second or third grade, but the conflicts are fairly simple, not very wacky, and wouldn't play on screen too well. I finished it in a day-- a quick, fun read.

  • Amy Gourley
    2018-12-25 20:13

    I read this book with Mallory. It was one of my favorite books as a child. This is the book that The Parent Trap movie is based on. I forgot the little funny parts of the book and reading it as an adult I got some more stuff that I probably didn't get out of it as a child.

  • Kathryn
    2019-01-19 13:31

    need to find English translation. "Parent Trap" is based on this.

  • Michael Fitzgerald
    2019-01-07 18:31

    Germany - ?

  • Tess
    2018-12-25 13:15

    An absolutely charming and wonderful children's book with lovable characters and an adorable, entertaining story that can be just as well enjoyed by adults.

  • Katri
    2019-01-12 16:23

    This was one of my favourite books as a child, I've read it goodness knows how many times! Been thinking of rereading it in German some time to practice my language skills.

  • Svic
    2018-12-28 18:23

    A fiam 3-ast kapott hangos olvasásra, ezt a könyvet kellett felolvasnia (anyai utasításra), úgyhogy mondhatni hangos könyv volt... :)

  • Lotti
    2019-01-10 21:26

    Voor de Hebban Challenge categorie 'Een boek dat je favoriet was in je jeugd' herlezen. Nog steeds een geweldig leuk verhaal.

  • Mercedé Khodadadi
    2018-12-30 17:11

    حس خوبي بود خوندن كتاب محبوب دوره كودكي پس از بيست سال، منتها ترجمه آن سالها را بيشتر دوست داشتم

  • Valerija
    2019-01-11 18:16

    This was one one my childhood favorites. I haven't read it since, so a lot of details were forgotten. This time I was reading it in German and original always makes different atmosphere for me. I liked it then, I like it now and no matter how different the world has changed I believe that children can still enjoy it immensely.

  • Vicky
    2019-01-03 15:32

    This is the first time I’ve read this book. Unlike many other reviewers I didn’t have the good fortune of coming across it when I was a child. I picked it up when I found it this year because one of my favourite movies is based on it. Yes, I’m in my thirties and The Parent Trap -the Hayley Mills version, of course- is still one of my favourite movies. It makes me smile every time. So there I was, trying to find something to read at night that would help me relax and put my problems at the back of my mind when I found it. It turns out that it wasn’t as childish as I was expecting. It’s for children, yes, but it’s not infantilising at all. There’s a lot there for adults reading the book to children, too. The characters, especially the girls, have an unexpected depth (unexpected to me, at least). And there’s loads of humour just below the surface that made this book even more enjoyable than I expected. Needless to say, I’ll read this one to my children when I have them and I'm getting a copy for my future niece/nephew. It’s a perfect book to read when you are not “adulting” well, comforting and fun, but at the same time it doesn’t make you feel like a dummy for reading children’s books.