Read Friendly Fire: Nuclear Politics & the Collapse of ANZUS, 1984 - 1987 by Gerald Hensley Online

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In 1984, the newly elected Labour Government’s antinuclear policy collided with a United States foreign policy based on nuclear deterrence. After two years of angry meetings, fraught diplomacy, and free-wheeling press conferences, this outbreak of “friendly fire” led to the unraveling of the Australia, New Zealand, United States Security Treaty (ANZUS) military alliance, eIn 1984, the newly elected Labour Government’s antinuclear policy collided with a United States foreign policy based on nuclear deterrence. After two years of angry meetings, fraught diplomacy, and free-wheeling press conferences, this outbreak of “friendly fire” led to the unraveling of the Australia, New Zealand, United States Security Treaty (ANZUS) military alliance, established in 1951. Based on previously classified government files in New Zealand, Australia, the United States, and the United Kingdom as well as interviews with key protagonists and the author’s own involvement in events, this account tells the inside story of this dramatic confrontation. This is the definitive account of a key turning point in New Zealand history and a dramatic story of powerful personalities tackling critical questions on the world stage....

Title : Friendly Fire: Nuclear Politics & the Collapse of ANZUS, 1984 - 1987
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ISBN : 9781869407414
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 336 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Friendly Fire: Nuclear Politics & the Collapse of ANZUS, 1984 - 1987 Reviews

  • Chris Walker
    2018-10-23 00:19

    An important contribution to the record of a fascinating era in New Zealand's international relations. Hensley gives a diplomatic insider's view of the crisis over nuclear ship visits that led to the end long-standing ANZUS alliance. Working in the Prime Minister's office, Hensley has a great deal of knowledge to share about PM Lange and the various diplomatic missteps that led to the breakdown of the relationship between New Zealand and its post-war 'Big Brother'. Lange fans beware - Hensley doesn't have many positive things to say about his former boss, portraying him as vacillating and difficult. However, he faithfully records many of Lange's witticisms; these provide a lightness and good humour to the text that is otherwise often absent due to Hensley's conviction that leaving ANZUS was a great mistake (My favourite was Lange's description of the volume of a private conversation with Margaret Thatcher - he claimed that she addressed him 'as if he were one of the larger pre-war German rallies').The major problem with this history is that although Hensley sets out to be 'dispassionate and accurate' he cannot help but key his personal views colour his depiction of the break up of the alliance and the move towards nuclear-free New Zealand as a regrettable mistake. His partiality is most apparent in his descriptions of 'the Left' as being a monolithic and intemperate bloc of activists, and in his positive spin on Western involvement in the Vietnam War, a reading of events that is selective, at best. He is also guilty of basing most of his text on either his own views or those, like Michael Bassett, who agree with him. Overall, this is worth a read for those interested in the events and the period. Hensley is at his best when discussing the wider implications of New Zealand's actions for regional and international relations. But there is a fuller and fairer history still to be written.

  • Brad Heap
    2018-10-21 02:01

    Good book on an important chapter in New Zealand's history.