Read Pacific Worlds by Matt K. Matsuda Online

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Asia, the Pacific Islands and the coasts of the Americas have long been studied separately. This essential single-volume history of the Pacific traces the global interactions and remarkable peoples that have connected these regions with each other and with Europe and the Indian Ocean, for millennia. From ancient canoe navigators, monumental civilisations, pirates and seaboAsia, the Pacific Islands and the coasts of the Americas have long been studied separately. This essential single-volume history of the Pacific traces the global interactions and remarkable peoples that have connected these regions with each other and with Europe and the Indian Ocean, for millennia. From ancient canoe navigators, monumental civilisations, pirates and seaborne empires, to the rise of nuclear testing and global warming, Matt Matsuda ranges across the frontiers of colonial history, anthropology and Pacific Rim economics and politics, piecing together a history of the region. The book identifies and draws together the defining threads and extraordinary personal narratives which have contributed to this history, showing how localised contacts and contests have often blossomed into global struggles over colonialism, tourism and the rise of Asian economies. Drawing on Asian, Oceanian, European, American, ancient and modern narratives, the author assembles a fascinating Pacific region from a truly global perspective....

Title : Pacific Worlds
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781139215992
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 454 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Pacific Worlds Reviews

  • Alison
    2018-11-27 14:23

    A surprisingly effective and affecting book, Matsuda's sprawling narrative traces the story of Pasifika peoples from pre-history through to the last decade. At the risk of overstretching my own writing abilities, Matsuda's writing ebbs and flows a bit like the sea itself - his chapters take you through themed stories and events, moving slowly through time, ebbing back and forth on the way, and bringing you to connected. Frequently, in fact almost inevitably, the narrative suddenly takes you somewhere you didn't expect - from the Tampa to the Vietnam War for example. If you have read Zinn's Peoples History of the United States, the structures are similar. If you want to progress from A to B with a clear understanding of how and why everything happened between the points and to keep the points in a clear order (and I tend towards the linear), it's a frustrating experience. When I finally gave up, however, and just let the book take me where it wanted to go, however, it started to become magical. The narrative is never forced, and Matsuda succeeds in conveying the interconnections and seperations through the structure as well as the words. What I ended up with as a result was both a head full of facts, and a less definable sense of *place* and community.The Pacific that emerges is a place of longstanding culture and relationships, which shape newcomers just as new arrivals bring changes themselves, and those changes are incorporated into broader Asia-Pacific culture. My knowledge of pacific and Asia-Pacific events tends to be limited to the individual country or event, and reading this gave me much more of a sense of the tapestry within which those events occurred, laughing at the kind of isolated understanding I thought I had had.In the end, the book succeeds in providing context, and in profiling a resilient, complex and fascinating group of peoples, telling enough of their stories so you can glimpse something true - zooming around patches of an intricate tapestry or sea on a journey from one end to the other, without remotely claiming to show you the 'whole', but nonetheless taking you from one end to the other.

  • Raquel Waith
    2018-11-28 12:47

    As I am looking for a true account of Samoan History, my reviews on all history books of the Pacific will be dismal as there is hardly any mention of Samoa in most. This has one chapter.

  • Amanda Leavitt
    2018-11-26 12:31

    This book was assigned to read as part of my History of the Pacific class and I thought it was extremely interesting. This book gives an overview of the history of all of the different sections of the Pacific ranging from Alaska and Kamchatka, to the islands, down towards Chile and South America. What I really liked was his story telling, he didn't just recite facts to his readers but used different accounts in the pacific to tie everything together. There was never really a time that I was bored or lost interest. Very well done!

  • James
    2018-11-18 10:27

    An ambitious - and successful - overview of the history of the Pacific, it's islands, countries and peoples. Rather than focus down on one country's history at a time, Matsuda is pretty successful in working with broad themes such as colonialism or economic exploitation to work through the histories in a series of contrasts and parallels.Daunting in scope--he includes a fair bit on China, Japan, Australia and New Zealand along with the many island nations--he ultimately succeeds in giving a flavor of the gifts, challenges, stories and heartbreaks of this important part of the world.

  • AskHistorians
    2018-12-06 13:39

    A large-scale, long-term history of Oceania that attempts to link Oceania's pasts and presents with Asia.